Adventures Down Under

In my last blog post I wrote about the marriage of my great grandmother Violet Stockelle to Larry Lewis in the Gorbals district of Glasgow. Since then I have been investigating their Australian adventure in August 1906.

During 1906, Harry Rickards, a former English music hall performer but now established in Australia as a theatre owner and agent, was touring the British Isles on the look out for new turns to engage for his Australian enterprises.   At some point Violet and Larry were booked as they both started touting the fact that they were “booked by H Rickards, depart for Australia August” in their theatrical card published in The Era. This was a means by which performers of the day kept theatre managers and agents updated as to their movements.

They set sail from Tilbury on 10 August 1906 on the RMS Ormuz, the Glasgow built pride of the Orient Line. The cost of their return passage was paid by Mr Rickards as part of their contract.

Graces Guide - RMS Ormuz

RMS Ormuz – image courtesy of Grace’s Guide

Their voyage to Australia took six weeks, via the Suez Canal stopping over at Gibraltar, Marseilles, Naples, Port Said in Egypt, and Colombo in Sri Lanka (formerly called Ceylon). From there the route continued across the Indian Ocean to the Port of Freemantle in Western Australia, then onto Adelaide, Melbourne and finally arriving at their destination Sydney on 21 September.

So what was life on board like, and how would Larry and Violet have occupied themselves for that six-week voyage? A report from The Times in January 1887 at the time of the Ormuz’s launch commented that:

The comfort of the residents in the ship has been studied to the point of luxury. The dining saloon, or coffee room as it is called, is a work of art. The panels are of rosewood inlaid with satinwood, and a large square window alternates with a mirror the whole length of the saloon.

There was also a library, a drawing room, smoking rooms, a theatre (one wonders whether Violet and Larry were invited to do a “turn”), an on- board orchestra, marble baths capable of being filled with hot or cold water in five minutes, a barber’s shop, a magnificent promenade on the uppermost deck wide enough for six to walk abreast where passengers could walk in mild weather and play deck games such as quoits and badminton. There was also the bar presided over by an expert in American drinks. Family reputation has it that it was probable that Larry spent some quality time here! The sights that Larry and Violet witnessed from the ship deck seem incredible to me – the beauty of the Mediterranean, the vistas and sounds of Egypt, Sri Lanka and yet this is a journey of which no one in the family was aware. There must have been postcards and letters yet none survive. All we suspect we have is an unusual carved bamboo pot!

Mr Rickards wasted no time in getting his new artistes from England before his audience and two days after their arrival, Violet and Larry made their Australian debut at the 2pm matinee at the New Opera House, Bourke Street, Melbourne on Saturday 22nd September. They were very well received by the Melbourne Press and continued to perform at the New Opera House throughout October and November, moving onto Rickard’s Sydney Tivoli (in Castlereagh Street) for a matinee performance on Saturday 17th November where they stayed for a further six weeks. They were joined on the “Rickards Tour” by Alf Chester, another comedian, Miss Florrie Henderson with her troupe of performing dogs and monkeys and the Harry Tate Company who were performing their sketches Motoring and Fishing.

I noticed when I was reviewing the Australian newspapers online that throughout December Violet began to disappear from reviews. It only seemed to be Larry and the other usual billed artistes that were getting a mention. And then I found the following in The Newsletter, a Sydney publication:

Mrs Larry Lewis (Violet Stockelle) was singing gaily at the Tivoli on Friday night and on Saturday morning a little stranger arrived – two months before it was expected. Both doing well.

But then on the same date as The Newsletter piece, the Sydney Morning Herald in Deaths reported the following:

Levy, December 7, 1906, at Paddington Ada Ray Sydney, daughter of Mr and Mrs Levy, professionally known as Larry Lewis and Violet Stockwell, age 6 days.

Having been born unexpectedly on Saturday 1 December, Ada Ray Sydney Levy had died within the week, the cause of death given as “premature”.  In amongst the tangle of papers and photographs I have inherited from my Dad was a black-edged photo I had always thought ghoulish and couldn’t bear to look at. I pulled it out and took a magnifying glass to read the coffin inscription – it was Ada. No one had understood before who she was. In those early days of photography, families were known to take a photograph of the deceased as a momento mori.

Ada R S Levy Deceased Dec 1906

Ada was buried on Saturday 8th December at Waverley cemetery in Sydney, one of the most beautiful spots in the world, located on top of the cliffs at Bronte in the eastern suburbs of Sydney. It is also the final resting place of Harry Rickards, the man who had brought Ada’s parents to Sydney in the first place.

Throughout this period Larry continued performing nightly with two matinees (Wednesday and Saturday 2.30pm). In theatrical parlance – the show must go on. The Sydney Morning Herald tells us that Violet made her return to performing on Boxing Day:

                Miss Violet Stockelle reappeared [at the Tivoli, Sydney] after her recent indisposition, and was warmly welcomed

Tivoli Theatre Sydney 1906

Image of Tivoli, Sydney with boards advertising Larry Lewis and Violet Stockelle

So great grandmother Violet was back on stage two and a half weeks after the sudden birth and death of her daughter but had also travelled half way round the world whilst preganant. What resilience and stamina she must have shown! She also managed to successfully hide her pregnancy bulge as all reviews refer to her daintiness and elegance. It may be that with Ada being so premature this had not fully manifested itself but it must have been a struggle to get her stage costumes on as the Australian tour continued. There was a happy outcome however – by the time of Larry and Violet’s return to England in March 1907, another baby was on its way. My grandmother Norah Ada Beatrice Levy was born in Kennington Park Road, Lambeth on 22 January 1908.